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  • #141081
    Jax
    Keymaster

    Explanations:
    1. If you’ve never taken anything, or if it was so long ago you don’t remember anything
    2. If you know what to do but have never gotten to practice with someone else.
    3. If you took a class with a YMCA or other seminar, specifically focused on self defense skills and includes practice.
    4. Martial arts without any extra self defense practice. Most traditional schools fit into this category. Note, if you were kicking someone in the head while standing as ‘self defense’, you weren’t learning practical self defense. ;-)
    5. If your style included practical aspects in addition to your regular techniques, or if you take a style that is all practical defense such as the real krav maga schools, some mma schools, or others.
    6. If you’ve taught yourself and practiced with others to go beyond theory.
    7. Military training through boot camp/basic training, and continued with refreshers. If you only have the training offered in boot camp/basic, please select the seminar only option (3).
    8. There are many things I’m sure I forgot, just add that in the comments. Having a picture of what people do is very helpful.

    #166245
    Jax
    Keymaster

    You can choose more than one, or focus on the dominant aspect of your training.

    I chose 5 because I spent 10 years in a martial arts style which always trained practical self defense with the other techniques. Focused techniques, fast, powerful, focused on most effective areas to strike on the body. My black belt training included defense from a chair, blindfolded, and defense from weapons to some extent.

    I’ve also done an aikido class which was self defense focused and lasted 6 weeks. That definitely requires more training time to use however. It was interesting to learn though.

    Finally, there was the bit I learned in the Marine Corps which didn’t really add to my knowledge.

    #166935
    Taijibum
    Participant

    Karate 1979-1985 Began with Tang Soo Do and ended as a black belt in American Freestyle at Ft Campbell and was on their kick boxing team.

    Tai Chi 1988-1994 with John Wang who was the Taiwanese National Champion from 1970-1974 when he moved to America. This is my primary art that I still practice and study relentlessly including Tai Chi Sword.

    Judo 10 months in 2008 and this was a riot but I kept getting injured so I had to stop.

    Iaido 6 months in 2010 which was pretty fun but I just didn’t take it as seriously as they wanted me to so I dropped the class.

    Fencing 4 months in 2011 which was a ton more fun than Iaido but I got laid off so I couldn’t afford it anymore.

    #168273
    Kol Drake
    Moderator

    Practices covering the early 70s through today…

    Hundreds of viewings of all of Bruce Lee’s movies spanning several decades. :P

    Karate – one semester @ University of Washington
    Kung Fu – six months
    Military – U.S. Army training beyond basic
    Tae Kwon Do – 3 years
    8 Brocades – three months
    Qi Gong — video teachings.

    Lately, nada since I am over 50 and looking at the energy and spiritual side of things although I am slowly picking up the 8 Brocades as ‘warm up’ and thinking about Qi Gong again.

    #168295
    Athais
    Participant

    I think a better question would be to ask how many people have had to use their martial arts training and/or how many people were ever in a situation where they wish they had martial arts training.

    Also, what about handguns. How many people own handguns? How many have a license to carry concealed? Handguns, like martial arts, require a certain amount of discipline. Many people don’t realize that.

    There are other ways of protecting yourself. When I was attacked in a parking ramp, the best weapon ever were the keys in my hand, especially the large one that went with the truck that I owned. Racked across the assailant’s face and gouged his eye out.

    #168296
    Jax
    Keymaster

    Formal training isn’t the only way to prove skill, but I was trying to get a feel for whatever training people had. When it comes down to it, if a person has a real life experience that will count toward proof of self defense.

    #168298
    Kol Drake
    Moderator

    Weapons? My dad has several rifles, shotguns and pistols and a handful of various military and non military knives. I’ve learned how to kill targets well over my kid years and did rather well popping targets in the military. Not ever had to gun anyone down. Have used some basic moves and holds to stop aggressors or to hold them until they got over their adrenaline surges. Taken a couple down to the ground.

    Closest to ‘really bad’ was a young girl all of 15 who was taking Tae Kwon Do with my daughter. They were both to brown belts at the time. She was waiting for the school bus to come along the highway to pick her up when a truck with two burley guys hopped out and tried to assault her. She took them both down; cell phones 9-1-1 and the sheriff came and hauled them off. Turns out they had sexually assaulted a few other over the years and were being ‘sought for questioning’. This girl was all of 5 foot 8 and more toward cheerleader then football line backer.

    So, knowing how to defend yourself — be it with fancy Bruce Lee moves or a knuckle full of keys or a good poke to the eyes and slaps to the ears can make the difference between going down or being taken down.

    #168299
    Jax
    Keymaster

    Wait, a tae kwon do student actually defended their self? This may be a first… ;-) I’m only partially kidding as most studios don’t produce students who could protect themselves unless attacked by the most unskilled of criminals. I’m really glad she did, that’s awesome!

    #168300
    jdmcowan
    Participant

    The only time I’ve ever had to use my martial arts was to stop a drunk from leaving a party to drive home. I didn’t have to use any of the techniques I had been taught – it all came from the basics. I just took a good stance, relaxed and ready, but minimal so it didn’t look threatening. He tried to push past, but I was too stable for him to move. He kept threatening me, but my relaxed posture and my confidence finally convinced him to back down.

    #168322
    Kol Drake
    Moderator
    Jax wrote:
    Wait, a tae kwon do student actually defended their self? This may be a first… I’m only partially kidding as most studios don’t produce students who could protect themselves unless attacked by the most unskilled of criminals. I’m really glad she did, that’s awesome!

    I suppose I should have added. Their TKD Master/Instructor is also a city cop. He teaches them grapple holds and other ‘how to take down a perp’ moves as kind of a break from regular lessons )or play time after a good showing at a rank competition.

    zen-ryo senshi wrote:
    The only time I’ve ever had to use my martial arts was to stop a drunk from leaving a party to drive home. I didn’t have to use any of the techniques I had been taught – it all came from the basics. I just took a good stance, relaxed and ready, but minimal so it didn’t look threatening. He tried to push past, but I was too stable for him to move. He kept threatening me, but my relaxed posture and my confidence finally convinced him to back down.

    If you have to ‘think about it’ (ie. what move to make or routine to follow) you are halfway toward being ‘toast’ already. As you note, you must ‘just’ stand up and relax and let the moment happen and act accordingly. Instinct and practice practice practice ensures you will have ‘moves’ to make to take then down successfully.

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