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  • #140117
    Anonymous

    If I were to cut a piece of skin off some one without their permission or desire, because I believed I should do it, what would that make me? But if I was from one of the established religions that does that sort of thing as part of their beliefs what would that make me then? I hope you understand what I am getting at this is just an extreme example of the way religion is privileged in many societies, many people end up in mental hospital or on medication when they say they hear voices in their head, but when a religious person says they hear the voice of God or sum prophet or saint, they don’t usually end up in mental hospital or on medication.

    I always look at these things as if I were an alien visiting this planet and step outside my knowledge and view things from a totally different point of view.

    #157594
    Anonymous

    I choose not to have my son circumcised because his body is his, not mine upon which to make that decision. Unfortunately, my now ex-husband and his mother went behind my back, forged my signature, and had him circumcised. All for the sake of a religion.

    When a child is born, they are usually born into the religion of the parents, or at least one of the parents. So they are raised in that religion and come to believe all that religion teaches. Their choice to believe otherwise is, essentially, taken away. This is how religion is passed on.

    Imagine what would happen if a child was given a choice. Would that child have chosen the religion of their parents? Would that child have believed in God? Or would that child be an atheist? With many children, we will never know because they have been raised in their parents’ religion.

    Religion takes away the authentic self. It may even force a child to believe something that they never would have believed. In the end, it forces the child to lie. That is the problem with religion.

    I didn’t raise my children in any religion. Both of my children are atheist. My son is Buddhist. My daughter has chosen no set path.

    I look at my children and wonder what would other children of the world be if they were given the choice to choose the path they want to follow.

    In the end, though, the question is this, “Would not a religion be stronger, not weaker, if the members of that religion choose that religion rather than being forced into that religion?”

    Athais

    #157598
    Stryse
    Participant

    Religions should be personal affairs.   

    #157602
    Jedi_Phoenix
    Moderator
    Quote:
    Religions should be personal affairs.   

    *like* :)  Well, I guess in a way I like the part about it being a personal affair.  The universe is so big and we only understand so little.  When we are truly open minded to the perspective of life and how immensly big it is, it makes you wonder about life and your role in it.  For me, I have my spirituality to guide my path.  I have to say religions might have their purpose, but its limitations begin and end (in my opinion) as a source of congregation for like-minded people.  Much beyond that, and you start stepping on people’s toes…

    Phoenix

    #157605
    Stryse
    Participant

    Indeed.

    That’s why my congregation is strictly BYOR.  BYOB too, sometimes,  but… bring your own religion.

    #157608
    Anonymous

    Religion is only personal if you are given the freedom not to take part in it, as children we were forced into Christianity in school there was a religious service every morning and if you did not attend you were classed as late for school and were punished, please don`t tell me about choice we were only 4 years old.

    #157610
    Stryse
    Participant

    As I said, it should be a personal affair.  Should and is are not always aligned.

    Personally, I consider indoctrinating children into a belief system borderline criminal.    When they come of an age they start asking such questions, is the time we should start exposing them to avenues for them to find their own answers.   

    However, as I’m only a parent to three dogs and a cat (and dogs and cats have their own spiritualities), what do I know about child-rearing.

    #157614
    Deraleth
    Participant

    I personally feel that children should not be exposed to any one religion until the age of eighteen, instead being taught in their youth to be compassionate, respectful, intelligent, and productive people. When they reach the age of consent, then they can be allowed to get involved in a religion, if they so choose. They should not be brain-washed during their more formative years when there are more important things for them to learn, and I do not mean what one learns inside a classroom, as the most important lessons are rarely found there.

    #157616
    Stryse
    Participant

    I think children are far more capable than we give them credit for.  The ‘age of consent’ is arbitrarily set as it is. 

    Rather than deny them the experience, and the freedom to choose to experience it, until some mandated date seems a disservice.    Children are not devoid of spirit and cutting them off from any spiritual experience, simply out of caution that they not be brain-washed by that experience is unhealthy for them, as well as their parent.    Discretion, moderation, and common sense should prevail.    There is a reason people turn to religions in the first place, and those reasons begin earlier than life than that.

    I certainly endured forced-religion.  I started out embracing it, but couldn’t reconcile it.  I don’t honestly believe I am that much stronger of mind that I’m an exception rather than a general rule.    It would have been nice if, after having given it a chance and deciding it wasn’t my path, that my dad had accepted it more graciously, and respectfully.  Instead I spent some years sitting quitely in contempt while the people around me praised their god.  (I would later come to a reunderstanding of that entity.)

    I’ve suffered my fair share of ‘abuse’ at the hands of religion.  I’ve managed to come out of it all right, and a bit better off for the experience.  I saw past what James has brought up here and looked deeper into religion and found a way to reintegrate it that isn’t damaging to my soul, my spirit, or anyone else’s.    There is a great deal of beauty in Christianity, I found, long after I had abandoned my endeavors to be Christian.

    If someone wants to be a good parent, the key is the same as with any relationship.  It all starts with listening, from the heart, to what they are telling you.

    I think, however, we are dove-tailing into another topic… raising your children on the Jedi path:      ht[url=http://tp://instituteforjedirealiststudies.org/smf/index.php?topic=564]tp://instituteforjedirealiststudies.org/smf/index.php?topic=564[/url]

    #157617
    Deraleth
    Participant

    I urge you to re-read the first sentence of my post. I stated that children should not be exposed to any one religion, meaning that they should be taught about all different paths, not just strictly one way, especially since there isn’t just one way. I still stand by my other statement though, that people shouldn’t be allowed to officially participate in an organized religion until their country’s age of consent.

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