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  • #139837
    Anonymous

    Jedi way, Warrior way, whats the difference? I know there is a Warrior part to being a Jedi, I just wanted to know what you lot thought of as the main differences.

    #155324
    Aslyn
    Participant

    Please tell me that you already know and are just curious as to our views…

    #155325
    Kol Drake
    Moderator

    Some of the early study groups read “Way of the Peaceful Warrior”.

    Thanks to the influence of the ‘newest movies’ of the Star Wars series, many see/saw the Jedi as primarily fighters since they are in the middle of a war.   Many saw/see this as a reason to study marital arts; to hone body, mind, and spirit (and be ready in case the robot army comes marching down the avenue).   :P

    Honestly, many do see martial arts in whatever form as a means of keeping fit, honing body, mind, etc. and a nice excuse to wear some killer togs.   ;D

    That in itself does not mean the Jedi are ‘warriors’ though I suppose if one reads enough, one would say they definitely try to attain a ‘warrior spirit’ and bushido like attitude.   Many see the ancient traditions of the Knights Templar, those of the Round Table, and other groups which fostered chivalry, honesty, ‘right thinking’, etc. as being goals worthy of studying and following.  Again, it does not necessarily mean Jedi wish to don armor and horse and ride off to slay the wicked… though I know a few who are looking for damsels in distress to help out.   ;D

    #155326
    Jax
    Keymaster

    The warrior way is not the martial way, though the martial way is ideally a warrior way.  The Jedi way must include the warrior spirit, otherwise a person cannot become a Jedi.  It requires perseverance, courage, discipline, and resilience.  My experience of the warrior path is that there is no Jedi path without the warrior path, which is simply one of cultivating a warrior spirit.  Some may say that is overly simplistic, or that the warrior path must require martial elements, but that’s not my experience.  So, the answer depends on how you define the warrior path to begin with. 

    #155327
    Anonymous

    Yes Aslyn I am curious to learn about other peoples views, as I am new here I am trying to find out as much as possable, If this question has been asked before please tell me.

    #155328
    Anonymous

    Jax I have seen that the  warrior way is different to each person who is compelled to practice it, mybe I am wrong but the Jedi way seems to be the same, although there are a set of basic guidelines. The warrior way has many different forms, but basicly  involves some kind of combat training.

    #155329
    Jax
    Keymaster

    That’s what I’m saying though, there are many writings that separate the warrior way from that of combat training.  They are not linked.  In fact some of the greatest warriors I’ve known never trained a day in their life, some were unable to train even if they wanted to due to physical disability.  I think linking the two is a misunderstanding of the warrior path.  Have you read Shambhala?  It’s training as a warrior without any combat training in any way.  You can also look at Dan Millman’s teachings on the warrior path. 

    Another way to look at it is that what makes a martial artist a warrior is the warrior spirit.  A person can train their entire life without being a warrior.  The difference is not physical, thus it doesn’t take physical training to be a warrior.  It’s the easiest way to cultivate a warrior spirit for most people, because becoming a warrior requires overcoming adversity.  But it doesn’t have to be physical adversity, in theory. 

    #155330
    Kol Drake
    Moderator

    What it means to be a Jedi and ‘why’ we look at /study what we do has been the evolving ‘path’ this place has been on for years.  See posts going back to 2007 and earlier and we address these issues more then a few times.  

    And, that is the beauty of this path… that it is flexible and open to new insights rather then fixed and rigid to an extreme.

    #155332
    Anonymous

    Shambhala, their weapons are compassion and insight, yes Jax I have heard of it, will read it and Dan Millman’s teachings on the warrior path. Also “Way of the Peaceful Warrior”. but in my experence it takes a bit more than compassion and insight to survive some siuations.
     

    #155333
    Andy
    Participant

    You know historically anyone who claimed to be a warrior with out being prepared for war was unheard of.  The idea of the “peaceful” warrior is a modern creation.  My view is that cultivating the personal qualities of a warrior does not necessarily make you a warrior.    

    Historically, being a warrior is quite different than what it means in our modern feel good society.  They hailed those people like George Washington, Alexander the Great, Lord Nelson, Musashi.  All them fighting men.  All of them honored for their warrior capabilities.  People saw the qualities they possessed and desired to emulate them, however without actually seeing battle, none of these people would have called themselves warriors if they had not actually been in war.

    Our modern society no longer honors prowess and achievement, it honors the spirit in which things were done.   People call themselves warriors becasue they feel that simply possessing the qualities of a warrior entitles them to use that word to describe themselves.  Courage, determination, sacrifice etc…. I am of a differing opinion.  Just because someone has the determination to push themselves does not mean they are warriors, it just makes them determined.  Someone may have the courage to face cancer, that does not make them a warrior, it makes them courageous.  A jedi does not have to be a warrior but can still have all the traits.

    Instead of saying a jedi “has this and that of a warrior”, Why don’t we just say a jedi shows exceptional courage.  A jedi pushes themselves hard and as such shows uncommon determination.  We do not actually need to call ourselves warriors becasue in modern times so few of us actually are tried and true warriors in a historical sense.  Just because being a “spiritual warrior” or a “Peaceful warrior” is the new buzz word, that does not mean we have to use it.  

    A jedi can be a warrior.  And i feel, if they have gone to battle or is faced every day with those situations, this entitles them to use the word.  If not that is fine too becasue every jedi needs to have courage, every jedi needs to show kindness, every jedi should serve etc… and they do not need to call themselves “warrior” because they can just call themselves jedi.

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