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  • #140102
    Jax
    Keymaster

    (The instructions for this project are found in a separate thread. Read this first. http://instituteforjedirealiststudies.org/smf/index.php?topic=1817.0)

    This thread will be used to discuss the behavioral attributes a Jedi could work toward.  For instance, how does a Jedi act?  What do they need to know to act in a way that is recognized as Jedi?  This includes the attributes needed to act as a Jedi in society – leadership, mediation, etc.  I will occasionally edit this post to add the suggestions added to this thread.

    Leadership
    – Understanding Power
    – Influence without Power
    – Followership principles
    – Team Building
    — Learning Process
    — Coaching/Training/Mentoring
    — Group dynamics
    – How to empower people

    Self Awareness (Emotional Intelligence)
    – Knowledge of all aspects of self
    — strengths and weaknesses
    — personal issues and triggers
    — how to address and move beyond weaknesses/issues/triggers
    — Emotions as messengers
    — How do I think or perceive things differently than others (Culture/Religion)
    – Balanced self
    — Mind, Body, Spirit
    — Meditation for personal insight
    Authentic self – known and understanding
    Personality profile
    Self-management
    Relationship building
    Ethical practices
    Decision making

    Communication
    — Interpersonal Communication
    — Communication between generations, genders, cultures
    — Conflict Resolution
    — Verbal De-escalation (non-violent communication)
    — Diplomacy, Negotiation, Arbitration
    Written communication skills
    Impromptu speaking skills
    Prepared speaking skills

    Vision
    — Goal Setting
    — Decision Making
    — Critical Thinking

    Now one thing I can think of going along with this comes from the Celestine Prophecy, the Power Struggles in relationships, and recognizing power struggle situations, though this talks about energy flow, and energy stealing, it can also apply to simple power struggle situations. The book talks about four main ones, the aloof, the Intimidator, the poor me and the interrogator. 
    Intimidators steal energy from others by threat.
    Interrogators steal it by judging and questioning.
    Aloof people attract attention (and energy) to themselves by playing coy.
    Poor me’s make us feel guilty and responsible for them.
    By recognizing these power struggles, we can learn to overcome them. First is learning how we ourselves, use these power struggles, confronting them, and learning to stop. The second part is learning to recognize when we are being put into these situations and how to counter act them. In most case’s the way to deflate these situations is simply to name them. Asking an Intimidator, “why are you so angry?”, will often cause them to explain, and in doing so, deflate the situation.

    #157300
    Jax
    Keymaster

    Here are things that have been discussed in the faculty area.  Some of these aren’t detailed enough but I wanted to get them down as a start.

    Leadership
    – Understanding Power
    – Influence without Power

    – Team Building
    — Learning Process
    — Coaching/Training/Mentoring
    — Group dynamics

    Self Awareness (Emotional Intelligence)
    – Knowledge of all aspects of self
    — strengths and weaknesses
    — personal issues and triggers
    — how to address and move beyond weaknesses/issues/triggers
    — Emotions as messengers
    — How do I think or perceive things differently than others (Culture/Religion)
    – Balanced self
    — Mind, Body, Spirit
    — Meditation

    Communication
    — Interpersonal Communication
    — Communication between generations, genders, cultures
    — Conflict Resolution
    — Verbal De-escalation
    — Diplomacy, Negotiation, Arbitration

    Vision
    — Goal Setting
    — Decision Making
    — Critical Thinking

    #157309
    Memnoich
    Participant

    Now one thing I can think of going along with this comes from the Celestine Prophecy, the Power Struggles in relationships, and recognizing power struggle situations, though this talks about energy flow, and energy stealing, it can also apply to simple power struggle situations. The book talks about four main ones, the aloof, the Intimidator, the poor me and the interrogator.   

      [li] Intimidators steal energy from others by threat.[/li]
          [li] Interrogators steal it by judging and questioning.[/li]
          [li] Aloof people attract attention (and energy) to themselves by playing coy.[/li]
          [li] Poor me’s make us feel guilty and responsible for them. [/li]

    By recognizing these power struggles, we can learn to overcome them. First is learning how we ourselves, use these power struggles, confronting them, and learning to stop. The second part is learning to recognize when we are being put into these situations and how to counter act them. In most case’s the way to deflate these situations is simply to name them. Asking an Intimidator, “why are you so angry?”, will often cause them to explain, and in doing so, deflate the situation.

    #157316
    Anonymous

    Regarding Leadership:

    Able to set a goal/vision
    Ability to give praise
    Able to give and receive feedback
    Not afraid to avoid confrontation
    Willing to take risks
    Has critical thinking skills
    Willing to make decisions and accept the outcomes
    Honesty
    Integrity
    Able to see opportunity
    Able to elevate others along with him/herself; empowering
    Specific in regards to expectations
    Does what is right rather than what is popular, least confronational, convenient, or will garner friends/maintain friendships
    Able to be a servant
    Optimistic
    Determined
    Able to think outside the box
    Pro-active
    Fore-sighted
    Empathic
    Committed
    Organized yet able to be flexible
    Willing to step outside their comfort zone
    Able to set goals
    Able and willing to delegate tasks
    Trustworthy
    Good listener and communicator
    Believes in him/herself
    Team player

    Self-awareness:

    Authentic self
    Personality profile
    Emotional intelligence
    Self-management
    Relationship building
    Communication
    Ethical practices
    Team development
    Developing good judgment
    Leading change
    Community building

    Communication:

    Able to provide complete information
    Getting the message through with the least amount of words
    Keeping the receiver in mind when preparing the message (what is called ‘audience’)
    Being definite and specific
    Clarity
    Considering the receiver’s feelings/reaction
    Correct use of grammar, spelling, and punctuation

    General Knowledge:

    CPR
    First Aid

    That’s just starters.

    Athais

    #157317
    Jax
    Keymaster

    That’s a good start, thank you. If you don’t mind, I’m going to shift CPR and First Aid to the physical thread.

    #157382
    Stryse
    Participant

    I might also add the Nonviolent Communication (NVC) process to the behavioral list.    Its a good tool for resolving interpersonal conflicts, and perhaps more importantly, proactively avoiding actual conflict through improved interpersonal communications upfront.     

    #158315
    Anonymous

    Very useful material it’d come from reading all this.

    I’d be particularly interested in finding useful bits from it. I personally dislike methodical approach to human relations.  :r2d2
    I prefer rather to go with the flow, feel and sense what needs be done. That works best when you’re close to people.

    But practical and helpful tips that take into account someone like me, who goes with the flow and might well use more than known senses or even Force to interact with people would be awesome… like a light and delicious cake.

    #158330
    Anonymous

    I’d add

    How and why to accept your good and bad sides? Why and how to love and respect yourself as you are? What are the benefits of such inner cultivation?

    How to be conscious? Practical examples of being conscious versus acting on past knowledge and prejudices.

    Thinking ergo addressing a moment through past knowledge and experience versus being in the moment and being open to feel the present as it is. What are the outcomes of someone approaching someone or something in their habitual way versus being here and now?

    How do we feel emotions? How to take control over yourself from your emotions and feelings? Why to do it? What possibilities of richer and more fulfilled life will it open for you?

    #158331
    Jax
    Keymaster

    All good questions.

    #158333
    Anonymous

    I do have the answers for them :) and am willing to share them.

    I may well do it some day.

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