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  • #157592
    Macgilleon
    Participant

    Tai-Da there are a few things I would recommend that you look at. First I’d not recommend a drastic change overnight… Recce the lifestyle and the places that you can live it in. Such a place would be Alberta the climate changes are not that far different from Scotland and Should you chose to remain the Transfer from one commonwealth country to another is not necessarily as difficult say as a standard immigration.

    Second unless you are used to riding, a Cowboy lifestyle can literally be a pain in the ass(trust me on this) When I was posted out West I took part in a few events, just about busted my fool neck…LOL But a decent show to look at right now would be Rodeo, Life on the Circuit. It follows some of the Canadian Cowboys around to all the rodeos. But it only shows that part of the life… the rest Well you’ll have to seek that out for yourself…

    #157593
    Jax
    Keymaster

    To be clear, I’m not saying to abandon a dream. However, big dreams, especially those that are quite far off can be a major source of problems in a person’s life if they don’t handle them well.  What often happens is a person has a romantic view of their dream.  They view it as the thing that will save them from what is unpleasant in their own life.  They live for the future dream without addressing the current problems.  And since they have a long journey to this dream the feeling it provides is often one of longing and suffering, not of inspiration.  That’s why I recommend people look at what it is that inspires them about a dream of any kind and see how it can be incorporated in stages.  It’s a method that can get them to their dream incrementally making it easier to achieve if they find the dream is something they truly want.  It’s also a way of living in the present more easily and being more satisfied with their life. 

    This is what I’ve done to walk the very long path toward the dreams of my wife and I with the music business.  She has the ability, once well, to be a successful record producer.  She has a unique way of observing people and music, and can then relate to people in a way that helps them reach a new level of connection to their art.  The only thing truly unrealistic about the goal is her health.  So to break it down we focus on continuing to train her mind and ears as is possible.  We go to concerns, we discuss music, she reads books and listens a lot.  Basically, the dream is still worked toward in tiny increments with a focus on remaining positive about it.  If the dream were to become a negative experience or a burden then it would no longer be beneficial and hinder her healing process. 

    That’s just one example of this process.  So yes, Tai-da, go for your dream.  But learn more about it.  Arizona isn’t as a general rule a welcoming place right now.  And ranchers can be quite conservative, based on what I’ve learned about the conflicts between new and old ranchers in Texas.  Therefor it’s not something to just jump into, even if you had the money to do so.  There are definitely some ways to experience the old west which is why I suggest the dude ranches.  I remember hearing of ones that you can visit for the summer which would give you a pretty good taste of being a real cowboy.  But even that takes money.  You may want to look around your area and see if there’s a farm you can help out at in the meantime.  That would be a goal attainable virtually overnight and fill that space in you that wants to work hard with your body and be outdoors.  You can always pretend you’re a cowboy while you do it. ;-)

    #157595
    Brandel Valico
    Participant

    I say go for it myself. But heed what Jax is saying. Do it when the time is right and with the correct amount of research and precautions in place.

    Heck it’s not like a bunch of people who are seeking to become Jedi are going to say it can’t be done. So I’d also suggest discussing it with loved ones and grant far more weight to those who would be making the move to that lifestyle with you. Listen to what they have to say. Work on the issues if any they have. But really listen to them. Then decide and move from that point if it’s still something you feel strongly about.

    #157597
    Stryse
    Participant

    and if Arizona doesnt work out…  the cowboy life style is alive and well in northern nevada.    (THough i’ll echo what others have said.. its a far cry from the cowboy life depicted in film.)

    #157611
    Magdelene Nashira
    Participant

    You can be a cowboy (or rancher, farmer, etc) in eastern Oregon too, and right along the south-eastern border with California.  In the general area of Klamath Falls, Malin, Weed, and south into california.

    #157612
    Stryse
    Participant

    Indeed.  Oregan hosts an annual round-up where you can experience something of the cowboy life as it really is.  I will likely be up in Pendelton this September for that. 

    Yup.. the cowboy life is alive and well in the pacific mid-west.    :)

    #157641
    Memnoich
    Participant

    Well, and its actually prevalent throughout most of the Midwest. I’m here on the western slope of the rockies in colorado, and there is alot of ranching around here, and in the right place’s land is still fairly cheep. I’ll echo what most have said before me, it’s not like in the movies, cattle drives are more of a tourist thing anymore, you have to be real good at budgeting, as you usually only get paid once a year, when you sell your stock, and then have to make that last the year. Add to that the general decline in prices, large companies coming in and forcing drops in pricing, increase in cost’s, increase in paying farm hands, etc.. My uncle is a rancher, though he’s kinda scaled back big time since 2000, and now owns a used car dealership where he spend most of his time. To be truthful, if I was going to look into ranching, I would also look into supplementing that ranching with Hydroponic farming. According to latest technology, you can grow roughly 6 acres worth of food, in less then an acre, hydroponically. This would allow you to do your ranching, provide your own feed, as well as supplement you income, in less space. Don’t get me wrong, there is something to the manual labor, the owning land, and living the country lifestyle, but it’s not an easy life, and more and more, it’s becoming more difficult for farmers and ranchers to make ends meet.

    #157646
    Brandel Valico
    Participant

    From what I understand of it and I freely admit that knowledge is extremly limited. If your truley interested in the cowboy way of life and ranching. You may wish to look towards Australia instead of North America.

    #157695
    Magdelene Nashira
    Participant

    Yeah, I never thought of Australia, but I don’t know what they have.  They might be about the same as America.  I think we have some Australian Jedi, though.  Maybe they’ll post.

    #157696
    Jax
    Keymaster

    I know there are major issues in Australia with water though.  The farmers don’t have rights to the water that flows through their land even so farming is very difficult.  They’ve had major problems with drought for years and now flooding when they do get water.  So I’d just rule it out.

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