Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; multiLangField has a deprecated constructor in /home/institut/public_html/components/com_jshopping/lib/multilangfield.php on line 10

Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; parseString has a deprecated constructor in /home/institut/public_html/components/com_jshopping/lib/parse_string.php on line 2

Deprecated: Function create_function() is deprecated in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/rokcommon/RokCommon/Service/ContainerImpl.php on line 460

Deprecated: Function create_function() is deprecated in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/rokcommon/RokCommon/Service/ContainerImpl.php on line 461

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/cms/application/cms.php on line 471
Institute for Jedi Realist Studies - The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil - Institute for Jedi Realist Studies

The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

  • Tothian
  • Tothian's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Member
  • Member
  • I destroy evil.
  • Posts: 124
  • Thank you received: 18

Tothian created the topic: The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

I came up with this theory years ago, and posted it in my blog last year. It's here on this link:

tothian.blogspot.com/2011/11/4-aspects-of-fighting-evil.html

There could be several interpretations of it, depending on how any individual who is reading it chooses to interpret it. Here's what it says:

The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

I've spoken about this before, and I will again. From my studies and experiences, I've theorized that there are 4 aspects of fighting evil, and there are even other ways to interpret this in your own ways, but here are some of my ways of viewing it. And I will share them with you.

The Fire Aspect- This one is obvious. Just think of the term used time and time again. "Fighting fire with fire." That's what this one is. Vengeance. The advantage of it lies in how effective of a tactic it is at scaring evil. The disadvantage is overkill, taking things too far, when sometimes the punishment may not seem to fit the crime.

The Earth Aspect- This one makes me think of a fair, balanced version of fighting evil. Reaping what you sew. Since this planet Earth consists of all 4 aspects, any of the other 3 aspects can be applied where necessary. Justice. The advantage is that it's actions are equal to the evil it's attempting to fight, destroy, punish, or teach a lesson to. Not too much as to be considered unfair, yet not too little as to be considered weak and afraid to fight back. This one I feel most in line with, because I understand and accept all of the aspects, but agree with this ideal the most.

The Water Aspect- To fight hatred with love, cruelty with kindness. It's advantage comes with the times it's able to make an evildoer see the error of their own ways by comparison to the seemingly undeserved respect you show towards them. As in, if you want an evil person to be good, then first show them what good is. The disadvantage is for the times it can be viewed upon as a weakness.

The Air Aspect- This one I can interpret in a few ways. The first way I thought of it, a while back, was ignoring evil. It's advantage is against the type of evil that thrives off the attention it's given. Ignoring those types of evil people make them lose the motivation to do evil. Another way I had interpreted it had to do with a combination of knowledge and indirectly fighting evil. Such as being a strategist or someone in a support role who may not necessarily fight evil themself, but yet in a sense indirectly does by offering some type of advice or useful resource to help the other person fight evil. Praying could perhaps be considered this as well, yet supplemented with the intentions of any of the other 3 aspects.

Each of those 4 represent common tactics you see with Police, when interrogating people. The Good Cop (Water), The Bad Cop (Fire), That one Cop who is serious, can be friendly but also firm and strict (Earth), then there's that one quiet Cop that you don't know what they're thinking (Air).

One mistake I see certain Warriors make is denying the importance of aspects other than their own, rather than learning to balance out those other ones.

There are also mixtures of these elements as well, such as Lava, Ice, Mud, Smoke.
#29721
The following user(s) said Thank You: Jax

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 14881
  • Thank you received: 1909

Jax replied the topic: Re: The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

That's an interesting way to explain it. Using the elements will likely resonate with some immediately because they are familiar with the elements. For those that aren't, it gives them something to think about.

Thank you for sharing this, I quite enjoy it. It gives me something to think about as I learn to control my frustration in dealing with people.
#29737
The following user(s) said Thank You: Tothian

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Tothian
  • Tothian's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Member
  • Member
  • I destroy evil.
  • Posts: 124
  • Thank you received: 18

Tothian replied the topic: Re: The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

Thanks. I'm glad you found it interesting and useful.

A few years after I wrote this, I heard someone compare it to the Book of 5 Rings, which supposedly speaks about the different elements and such. I'm not sure if the 5th being Wood or Wind (the 4th being Air and not Wind, that is) I forget exactly though but I think it was Wind. I'm not sure how similar that is to that though.

And yes, sometimes different types of evil require different types of reactions. Must trust our logic and intuition with this. When ever I tell people "I destroy evil" they immediately think that I'm going around destroying the people. Well, not unless the only method in defense of the lives of others who are innocent and defenseless, and/or, myself. But, it's a lot more thought out than that, through knowledge, and experience. Which ever works for that situation.

The idea is to not like the idea of evil, and also not to exclude others' methods in this whole thing, but rather see what use their methods have.
#29743

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Kol Drake
  • Kol Drake's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Faculty
  • Faculty
  • koldrake55@yahoo.com
  • Posts: 4321
  • Thank you received: 1956

Kol Drake replied the topic: Re: The 4 Aspects of Fighting Evil

"The Book of 5 Rings (Go Rin No Sho) by Miyamoto Musashi

-- Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, Void.

A classic and one many popping around the IJRS have read and mentioned in posts/threads.

During Musashi’s time, many schools of swordsmanship claimed that their founders had been enlightened to their techniques by divine revelations, dreams, or the like. Ito Ittosai, for example, secluded himself in the Grand Shrine of Mishima for seven days and seven nights and was rewarded with the revelation of the Itto-ryu. Gods and demons supposedly revealed secret styles to such other famous martial artists as Tsukahara Bokuden, of the Shinto-ryu; Okuyama Kyugasai, of the Shinkage-ryu; Hayashizake, the founder of iaido; and Fukui Hei’emon, of the Shindo Munen-ryu.

Musashi, however, shunned mystic revelations. “Respect the gods and buddhas, but do not rely on them,” he wrote. His style, he declared, was based on personal realizations arrived at through experience, observation, reason, and the Way—the transcendent laws of nature. At the end of the first chapter of The Book of Five Rings, Musashi sums up his rules for understanding his style and putting it into practice:

1. Think in honest and direct terms.
2. Forge yourself in the Way.
3. Touch upon all the arts.
4. Know the Ways of all occupations.
5. Know the advantages and disadvantages of everything.
6. Develop a discerning eye in all matters.
7. Understand what cannot be seen by the eye.
8. Pay attention even to small things.
9. Do not involve yourself with the impractical.


Sounds VERY Jedi-like, no?

Four other key points Musashi emphasizes in the book are as follows.

The Way of Swordsmanship Is to Win

A commonly held notion throughout the period of warrior rule in Japan was that the Way of the samurai was to fight and die for his lord. While many found this to be reasonable — samurai means “one who serves,” and the samurai’s life and that of his household depended entirely on his lord — Musashi asserted that “the Way of swordsmanship is to fight with your opponent and win.” He had little patience for techniques that were visually appealing but impractical for beating an opponent. (( and THAT sounds like Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do ))

Musashi reasoned that, as death sooner or later comes to all, a warrior’s intent should be not to die with his weapons unmastered and “worn uselessly at his side.” For Musashi, the techniques the warrior learned for using his sword should be based on reason and practicality, with the understanding that they would be put into practice to defeat his opponent. A samurai’s lord supported him to vanquish his enemies, after all, not to be killed by them.

Fluidity of Mind

Musashi placed great emphasis on not permitting the mind to be blocked or caught by anything. Concentrating on the opponent’s sword, his footwork, his technique, or anything whatsoever would render the mind—and therefore the body — immobile. Thinking about one’s own technique or weapons would do the same. For Musashi, both body and mind must be free to flow, to respond to every change in the swordsman’s environment and situation. Inflexibility or a strong preference for one technique or weapon over another was worse than useless. Indeed, such prejudices could be one’s downfall. Fluidity implied being without obstructions, especially obstructions created by one’s own mind. “Fixing the mind on one special place,” he wrote, “will confuse the mind and inflict a malady on the martial arts.” An immobile mind meant a dead mind, just as an immobile hand would mean a lifeless hand.

Psychology

Musashi insisted that his swordsmanship was founded on “true principles,” not tricks or dishonesty. He specifically did not advocate a style based on “deception” or “duplicity,” as other martial artists and strategists did. Nevertheless, he taught that a swordsman must know both his own mind and that of his opponent. In this, he was in accord with Sun Tzu, the fifth century BC strategist who wrote, “Knowing your opponent and knowing yourself, your victory will not be in peril.”

Musashi deeply considered the character of his opponents, contemplating how he might knock each man off-balance, to make him lose his calm or get angry enough to shake his concentration. Again, Sun Tzu: “Therefore, the man who is good at combat controls others; he is not controlled by them . . . If the opponent is angry, irritate him; show weakness, and he will become arrogant.” Musashi’s bouts with the Yoshioka brothers and Kojiro Sasaki, when he caused his opponents to lose their temper, equilibrium, or confidence, were perfect examples of these techniques. He wrote, “In my martial art . . . you bend and warp your opponent, taking the victory by twisting and contorting your opponent’s mind.”

The Everyday Mind

While Musashi taught the basic positions for holding a sword, and certain techniques for striking and parrying, he emphasized that a swordsman should not be unduly concerned with such things. Any showy technique or secret style was only a distraction. Both mind and body, he declared, should be like the everyday: nothing unnatural, nothing extraordinary, nothing mysterious. Walking should be natural, the hands neither too tight nor too lax, posture good but not stiff. “In all things concerning the body in the martial arts,” he wrote, “make the everyday body the body for the martial arts, and the body for the martial arts the everyday body.” And “in the Way of the martial arts, do not let your frame of mind be any different from your everyday mind.” He encouraged the swordsman to be as natural as possible; otherwise, stances, striking techniques, the ways of directing the eyes, or particular attitudes would all become distractions, baggage preventing him from acting. To have one’s attention arrested would be to put an extra sword into the hands of one’s enemy.

Not bad for a guy from long ago and concepts many could use -- Jedi or not. For such a small book, Musashi packed a lot into a few short pages. The Book of Five Rings was written as a guide to be reflected upon, directed more toward the intuition than the intellect.
#29754
The following user(s) said Thank You: Tothian

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Tothian
  • Tothian's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Member
  • Member
  • I destroy evil.
  • Posts: 124
  • Thank you received: 18
Time to create page: 0.153 seconds