The Jedi Way, Part 4

When a Jedi does find it necessary to defend themselves, a moral code should accompany their fighting practice. As Jedi, they should follow certain ideas of loyalty, respect, and honesty toward each other, and strive for attitudes of unselfishness and benevolence toward the world at large. It is considered wrong to fight indiscriminately. One is not supposed to use their Jedi skills, for example, to get more money or better clothes, or to show off one's technique. Instead, such skills are to be used for self-defense purposes or to help others. This code explains why Jedi have the humanity to refrain from doing unnecessary harm to those who attack them.

If at first the reasons for why a teacher trains you in the same thing over and over again may be unclear to you. Do not despair. For as the roots of a tree are usually hidden from the observer, so too is the purpose behind most training often not seen by the new student. Some finding training boring and painful, often quit at this stage of training. Overanxious to know everything at once --- to taste the fruits and see the flowers of a full-grown tree, as it were --- they often fail to realize that the Jedi Way --- like the tree --- must begin slowly, down in the dirt, and only after this foundation has been set and a long period of growth has taken place will the tree bear fruit.

True competence comes from not only training the reflexes, but from training the mind as well. All too often young Jedi have superior physical skills, yet their ability to concentrate and relax their minds is lacking.

How does one tell the light from the dark? When you are calm, at peace, passive.

The Force is like any element of nature --- it has both positive and negative aspects: the light side and the dark side. The light teaches peace and harmony. It is the constructive side of the Force from which all love, understanding and knowledge originate --- it is the essence of life. Those who are at peace with them selves can learn to harness the amazing powers of the Force. The dark side is the counterweight to the light. Many young students falsely believe that the dark side is stronger than the light --- in truth it is only easier. The dark side springs forth from the negative and destructive impulses of all living beings --- anger, fear and hatred are its symptoms. Death and war are the byproducts of the dark side. It is dangerously seductive to those who lack the ability to control their emotions and passions. Those who give in to the dark side find their abilities greatly enhanced at first, but as time passes, the dark side does not respond so readily. The dark side demands more and more of those in its power. Those who are sensitive to the Force soon learn that there is no middle ground between the light and the dark. For most beings --- unaware of the power of the Force --- the struggle between light and dark is not as powerful, not as compelling. For those attuned to the Force, the struggle of good versus evil, life versus death, is of utmost importance. Those who learn the ways of the Force must be careful to remember their own inner peace or they will surrender themselves to the dark side. They must be careful not to start down the path of the dark side, for its self-destructive ways are difficult to leave once embraced.

The Ten Rules Of Engagement:

1) Let the Force be your guide. 2) Know your motives for becoming involved. 3) Seek to know the motives of others involved. 4) Be aware of outside motivators. 5) Understand the dark and light in all things. 6) Learn to see accurately. 7) Open your eyes to what is not evident. 8) Exercise caution, even in trivial matters. 9) Examine closely who benefits, and how they do so. 10) Examine closely who is harmed, and why.

The Force is not limited by space and time. It has no color and no shape, no beginning and no end. It is part of everything and at odds with nothing.

If a hundred thousand people do a dumb thing…. It's still a dumb thing. Wisdom is found in knowing what you know and knowing that you don't know what you don't know.

A person who knows he has committed a mistake and doesn't correct it is committing another mistake.

When a wise man repents of his mistake, he makes amends by acts, and when a foolish man repents of his mistakes, he makes amends by words. If you are sorry for what you have done, then I suggest that you make amends by real acts.

What should concern you are the following: that you have forgotten to cultivate your character, that you have neglected your studies, that you have not been able to follow the right course when you have seen it, and that you have not been able to correct your mistakes.
To be patient and gentle, ready to teach, returning not evil for evil: that is the Jedi way.

The Jedi by living a life of simple truth and earnestness, alone can help to bring about peace and order in the world. Only after having a definite pupose in life can one acieve calmness of mind. Only after ahaving achieved calmness of mind, can one have peaceful repose. Only after having peaceful repose can one begin to think clearly. Only after one has learned to think clearly, can one achieve knowledge. There are a foundation and superstructure in the constitution of things, and a beginning and an end in the course of events. Therefore to know the proper sequence or relative order of things is the beginning of wisdom.

Talking easily leads one into trouble because when you talk, you use so many words, and it is easy to let them out of your mouth, but difficult to take them back. Do not worry about people not knowing your ability, but worry instead that you do not know them.
You have every right to feel Emotions. Allow yourself to feel them -- really feel them -- and then let them go. If they come back, feel them again and let them go again. There is no shame in one's emotions.

A Jedi can't control how they feel. But they can control how they choose to handle how they feel.

A Story of Philosophy.

A philosophy professor stood before his class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a large empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks, rocks about 2" in diameter. He then asked the students if the jar was full? They agreed that it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was. The students laughed. The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. "Now," said the professor, "I want you to recognize that this is your life. The rocks are the important things - your family, your partner, your health, your children - things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else. The small stuff." "If you put the sand into the jar first, there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life. If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take time to get medical checkups. Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to go to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal. Take care of the rocks first - the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand."

The true mark of a Jedi is Peace:

Peace with oneself and with the world around us. Peace gained through knowledge, understanding, discipline and self-control.

Self-control is most difficult to master, as we are human beings and driven by emotion and sensory triggers. But we are also Jedi, learning to control our emotions and reactions. Ever seeking knowledge and enlightenment, a Jedi never uses his power to gain wealth or personal power. By learning balance, moderation and control we learn and grow in the Force.

By listening, by becoming peaceful, by turning our attention to the Force, we find that place where our individuality is joined to the knowledge and power of the universe. At some point a Jedi becomes one with the force. It consumes him, penetrates him, makes him part of all living things. To use the Force, one must be at harmony with it. Only when calm, at peace, can one act with assurance of control. To act in dissonance depletes one's power.

The Paths:

The light path starts narrow, so that new Jedi adhere to its teachings. As training goes on, the path widens slowly with time and knowledge.

The dark path however is wide. It runs just below the light path to catch the Jedi when they fall. After the dark path started it narrows. Each time it is used, the next act must be a little more evil than before.

Unlike the Light Side of the Force, which embraces the whole, the entire focus of the Dark Side is the self. For the Force is not itself good or evil; it is a reflection of nature, and nature itself can be cold and cruel. That is the choice of the Jedi: serenity or hatred; peace or anger; freedom or tyranny; learning or power; the Light or the Darkness. Because the use of the Force and the way the Force uses its user are one, the choice is inescapable.

The will and the Force are one; the actor and the acted upon, the same. There is no contradiction: there is unity. That is the Path of Light.
All futures exist in the Force. You do not choose the future so much as it chooses you. Do not look for answers there. According to their nature, there are both people who have a quick intelligence, and those who must withdraw and take time to think things over. Looking into this thoroughly, if one thinks selflessly and adheres to "The four Tenets of the The Jedi Code", suprising wisdom will occur regardless of the high or low points of one's nature.

People think that they can clear up profound matters if they consider them deeply, but they exercise perverse thoughts and come to no good becuase they do their reflecting with only self-intrest at the center.

It is difficult for a fool's habit's to change to selflessness. In confronting a matter, however, if at first you leave it alone, fix "The four Tenets of the Jedi Code" in your mind, exclude self-interest, and make an effort, you will not go far from your mark.

We learn about the sayings and deeds of the men of old in order to entrust ourselves to their wisdom and prevent selfishness. When we throw off our own bias, follow the sayings of the ancients, and confer with other people, matters should go well and without mishap.