(Re)Learning Old Skills

  • Posts: 147
  • Thank you received: 99

Hilda Cain replied the topic: (Re)Learning Old Skills

How is a scary though, for me at least, I garden and this year has been so wet, most things do not grow or rot on the vine. Lucky I can go get what i need at a store. BUT, what if you were dependent on what you grew, how would you survive if everything rotted on the vine?
#57021

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Kol Drake
  • Kol Drake's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Faculty
  • Faculty
  • koldrake55@yahoo.com
  • Posts: 4136
  • Thank you received: 1902

Kol Drake replied the topic: (Re)Learning Old Skills

The first English colony nearly died -- they didn't have a clue about proper planting timetables, etc. If not for the local Natives and resupply ships, they would have all died. Even so, over a dozen years, about 6 thousand came over and about 4 thousand died in that timeframe due to lack of food, disease and indian attacks.

These days, crop planting seems to be dictated by whatever 'cash crop' is hot that year. And if that crop fails... the farmers have to try and get their insurance to cover their losses (and hopefully, enough to buy seed for the next season).

(( imo, it stinks that Monsanto and their ilk have GMO'ed seeds so much that you can't 'save some' for next season but must purchase each year... AND activate the seeds with their chemicals... ))

The result of crop failure tends to affect farmers’ income, decrease the amount of food available for consumption, and also negatively affect the economy of a country, especially if it is an agriculture-dependent economy. Lack of sufficient food to sustain a population’s demand leads to hunger. If the situation persists, the population will definitely starve to death. The remaining population, which may survive the pangs of hunger, end up being malnourished, due to lack of food or certain nutrients in their bodies. Crop failure does not only affect human beings, the animals end up starving / dying too.

At one time, food was to eat... not to make a profit.
So, storage was encouraged... until, like the 1920s... when so much was overproduced, grain lost price value and ended up rotting in the silos. A major part of the great depression; overproduction killed off farms left and right.

To survive this weird weather, you really have to consider multiple crops... those that will survive under a wide range of weather. Even so, it can still end up being a roll of the dice if you 'win' or not during a growing season.
#57022

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 147
  • Thank you received: 99

Hilda Cain replied the topic: (Re)Learning Old Skills

My fathere was a part-time farmer, you can not make enough profit to raise a family with a small farm, so he had another job. And, you are right, you need the right amount of sun and rain to do well. Too much rain, the crops die, too much sun/heat the crops die. It is a dice roll. Now days, corporations "farm" for money not, food. They have GMOed food for heavy yield, to feed more people, but, at what cost? I am afraid that genetically redoing plants, will come back to bite us in the butt. You do NOT mess with Mother Nature and they have BIG time.
But, my original fear, was how could people survive with seed rotting in the ground and fruit/vegs rotting on the vine? Even with multiply types of vegs there would be hungry come winter. I thought of maybe putting tarps over fields to keep some of the rain off and groves to guide the rain away, this idea is not a good one, but, I am working on it. LOL, I actually also, thought about hydroponics that way if you are VERY careful you can have fresh food year away. I have been told these are nonsense fears, but, things are happening that are worrisome. And, it is an interest problem to look at.
#57023
The following user(s) said Thank You: Kol Drake

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Kol Drake
  • Kol Drake's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Faculty
  • Faculty
  • koldrake55@yahoo.com
  • Posts: 4136
  • Thank you received: 1902

Kol Drake replied the topic: (Re)Learning Old Skills

Anything over 'a small garden' and you are talking some major work, materials and labor when it comes to 'covering' or otherwise trying to 'science the s*** out of it'.

For a small garden, you can work out ways to make drainage/runoff work for you... either drain to a small holding pond or otherwise drain one crop to 'flood'/water another. In many cases, your best bet would be your suggestion of hydroponics. Next best? Probably setting up a greenhouse situation. Or in a pinch, elevated plots and building plastic sheeting with PVC 'ribs' to make a protective shroud.

We have a few posts -- like 'Aquaponics' and 'Vertical Gardening on your balcony' -- in "The Green Jedi" section.

And yes, stuff rotting in the ground and 'on the vine'?
In the old old days, the farmer would have had to pull up stakes and hope like heck to survive long enough 'in town' to try again the following year. If not get out of the farming business all together. Farming has never been an easy thing for the farmers and their families.
#57026

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 147
  • Thank you received: 99

Hilda Cain replied the topic: (Re)Learning Old Skills

My tomatoes and cucumbers have been rotting on the vine, ie they have black spots, mold, mildew while on the vine. I have thrown away so many this year. It is one of the worse years I have seen. But, yes, covering a large area would be next to impossible and you would have to garden in small plots. But, that is not a bad idea, if a plot got a disease it could be contained easier. Hydroponics would be safer in some ways, but, goodness help if anything went wrong. Probably doing both would be best. Lol, I know very little about hydroponics. And, yes, farmers have a hard life, but, many loved what they did and I think the land was better for it. The land and farmers worked together and feed people. Now days, it is a mess, in my opinion.
#57027
The following user(s) said Thank You: Kol Drake

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.154 seconds