Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; multiLangField has a deprecated constructor in /home/institut/public_html/components/com_jshopping/lib/multilangfield.php on line 10

Deprecated: Methods with the same name as their class will not be constructors in a future version of PHP; parseString has a deprecated constructor in /home/institut/public_html/components/com_jshopping/lib/parse_string.php on line 2

Deprecated: Function create_function() is deprecated in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/rokcommon/RokCommon/Service/ContainerImpl.php on line 460

Deprecated: Function create_function() is deprecated in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/rokcommon/RokCommon/Service/ContainerImpl.php on line 461

Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/institut/public_html/libraries/cms/application/cms.php on line 471
Institute for Jedi Realist Studies - Amen - what do you think its origins are? - Institute for Jedi Realist Studies

Amen - what do you think its origins are?

  • Posts: 945
  • Thank you received: 244

Baru created the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

Why do we say "amen"?
What do you think it means and why do you say it?

Here is a wonderful read that I just read that basically explains what I discovered the history and purpose of the word to be -

Basically put, I feel that "Amen" in all of its glory and variations is simply the honoring of history’s first monotheist, the Pharaoh Akhenaten - Amen - hotep.

He was the original "sun god" and his symbol is the "sun disk" with fourteen hands coming out of it like "rays" of the sun. He is the first person in history - written and modern history to implement a "monotheistic" religion.

Is it possible that this word remains an honoring to him?
----
The Origin of Amen[/center]

Amen is perhaps a word like no other. It is certainly used hundreds of millions of times daily to conclude prayer or supplication to omnipotent beings, and as a way to acknowledge the spiritual presence of something, or some “other” than one’s self. But from where did “amen” originate? And from what history or tradition?

Etymologically, the word’s root is Hebrew in origin, with its use spreading to eventually encompass Christianity and Islam. Amen is found in the Bible, of course, but also in the Quran and in Hinduism. Amen is a shared response to liturgical rites and a means of affirming sacred scripture. Beyond Judaism, in the fading mists of early history, the word can be traced to ancient Egypt and a particular line of pharaohs, that of the Amun or Amen –hotep lineage.

While there is absolutely no historical proof for the patriarch Abraham, there is plenty of evidence for the existence of four rulers of the Amen –hotep line. The last of these, Amen –hotep IV is today known as the heretic king, the most ancient ruler to whom history can attribute another origin, that of monotheistic belief. Amen –hotep IV, or Akhenaten as he is known, founded his new religion at the expense of the Egyptian neteru, the many faces of the trinity Amen – Ra – Horus, all of whom were banned under his short, ten-year rule, their images defaced and their temples destroyed.

During an indeterminate period of the Amen –hotep lineage the first Biblical character with a historically verifiable presence joined the Egyptian court. The biblical Joseph was perhaps a contemporary of Akhenaten (Amen –hotep IV) or of his forbears. The influences of monotheistic thought on this Semitic addition to the court of the Amen –hoteps could well have carried forward as an early form of proto-Judaism.

Though religious leaders will scoff at the coincidence of the relationship of the word amen to its royal forbear, it is virtually certain that much of the Hebrew language, as well as Aramaic, was derived from earlier Egyptian. In fact, at the time of Moses, a distinct Hebrew language had only recently come into existence. Moses, the Prince of Egypt, likely spoke Egyptian which made him unintelligible to the fledgling Hebrew population. In the Bible God suggests that Aaron speak for Moses, not because he stuttered, as biased scholars would have it, but because Moses needed an interpreter to speak to his Hebrew flock.

The very usage today of the word “amen” is an interesting conundrum. Is amen a holy affirmation, or is it simply a part of our collective memory of history’s first monotheist, the Pharaoh Akhenaten?

Amen.
----
Christians
Christians say either 'Ahh-men' or 'Ay-men'.

The 'Ahh-men' pronunciation tends to be a bit more formal and used in liturgy, choral music, etc. An example can be heard in the closing part of Handel's Messiah 'Worthy is the Lamb'2. The Ahh-men in the final chorus is repeated dozens of times, runs to six pages in a typical choral score, and usually takes around 3 minutes 40 seconds to sing.

The 'Ay-men' pronunciation is often associated with evangelical Christians and gospel singing. Unlike Handel's Messiah, the gospel chorus 'Amen' has only five words, all the same (Ay----men, Ay----men, Ay----men, Ay-men, Ay--men.) yet can take much longer to perform as it is repeated over and over again, bringing the congregation into harmony.

Jews
For Jews, Amen is also an acronym for El Melech Ne'eman, which means "Mighty, Faithful King".

Muslims
Muslims use Amen (Amin or Ameen) in the same way as Christians and Jews, even though the word does not appear in the Qur'an. Muslims say it after reciting Surah al-Fatihah, after completing their prayers, at the end of letters, etc.

Buddhists and Hindus
Many Buddhists and Hindus also use Amen at the end of prayers and as concurrence in the same way as the other religions.

But where did it all begin?

Pagans
From old Egyptian texts we can see that people regarded the Sun as the emblem of the Creator. They called the Sun Ra, and all other gods and goddesses were forms of the Creator. One of these gods was Amen; a secret, hidden and mysterious god named variously Amen, Amon, Amun, Ammon and Amounra. For the first eleven dynasties (c. 3000-1987 B.C.) Amen was just a minor god, but by the 17th dynasty (c. 1500 B.C.) he had been elevated to be the national god of southern Egypt. This position gave Amen the attributes and characteristics of the most ancient gods, and his name became Amen-Ra, that is, a supreme form of God the Creator. By the 18th Dynasty (1539-1295 B.C.) a college had been established to study Amen-Ra and as a focal point for worship.

The Jews settled in Egypt for around 400 years4 from 1847 B.C. and during this sojourn there is no doubt they would have been fully exposed to the worship of Amen-Ra. By the time of their exodus from Egypt in 1447 B.C., Amen would certainly be in their language even if it was not their god. It would be a word that had associations with reverence and majesty. This is not difficult to understand. People still talk about Moses, Jesus, Mohammed and Buddha, and often use those names completely out of context as expletives. Amen was seen as a powerful god and the name continued, out of context, as an exclamation or salutation; a classic example of language evolution. From the Jews, the word was adopted by Christians, Muslims and others.

So Amen was originally the name of a Pagan god, who was considered a form of God the Creator. But he was certainly not considered God, or Christ. Interestingly, most Pagans today tend not to use the word, preferring instead to say "So mote it be", an old Anglo-Saxon term. Perhaps they see the word Amen in the Bible and the Tanakh and don't want to be associated with Christianity or the like. Indeed, in the Bible3 we see Jesus Christ referred to as "The Amen". Christ is God's Amen to all that he has spoken. Thereby the name used for an old Egyptian god is replaced by the same name used for Christ.

Like many other words used in religion, (or art, mathematics, medicine, etc) it's easy to believe that our ancestors saw no point in creating new vocabulary when existing and familar words could be recycled. Yet some people are vehemently protective of things and believe Amen is a Biblical word which is also found in the Tanakh and in Islam, and happens to sound like the name of a Pagan god. Others believe it is an Islamic word that can also be found in the Bible and Tanakh. And so on. The whole issue is hotly debated and any Pagan link denied by many. Who knows how many accidental or deliberate mistranslations have crept in over the centuries.

Those who believe that God is the Great Mathematician will no doubt point to the numeric value of Amen:

"Finally, we may note that the word Amen occurs not infrequently in early Christian inscriptions, and that it was often introduced into anathemas and gnostic spells. Moreover, as the Greek letters which form Amen according to their numerical values total 99 (alpha=1, mu=40, epsilon=8, nu=50), this number often appears in inscriptions, especially of Egyptian origin, and a sort of magical efficacy seems to have been attributed to its symbol."

(Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 1; 1907)

Nowhere in the Bible, the Tanakh or the Qur'an can we find words to suggest one can be redeemed by merely uttering a magic word.

Whether Amen is magic, rooted in a Pagan deity, originally a Christian word, a Muslim word, a Jewish word, or anything else, the question is the same: So what? When Christians, Jews and Muslims say Amen, they do not invoke any god or any power just by saying that word or indeed any other word. Amen does not even make other words more sincere. But Amen, like all the other language we use, helps us to focus on what we mean in our hearts.
----
www.nairaland.com/283217/pagan-origin-word-amen

We are the Force.
#41168

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Brandel Valico
  • Brandel Valico's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Member
  • Member
  • CARPE NOCTEM
  • Posts: 431
  • Thank you received: 90

Brandel Valico replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

Why do we say "amen"?

Most due so simply because everyone else does. They have no actual idea what the word means or it's history. It's simply what they were taught to say at the end of a prayer.

What do you think it means and why do you say it?

I think it means "So Mote it be" :rofl actually I would consider it simply to be "So let it be"

As for why do I say it. I don't

HOMO SUM HUMANI A ME NIHIL ALIENUM PUTO
#41179

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 269
  • Thank you received: 48

Tai-Da Vrikaurvan replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

I have to agree with Brandel on this one. I remember when I was a Christian when I was a young boy and I asked one of the people who worked at the church helping out why we had to day Amen and they could not answer my question because they didnt know. Much of human kind follow blindly into things. I did at a time.

Jedi Apprentice Tai-Da Vrikaurvan
Apprentice to Jedi Phoenix
Former Apprentice to Streen Ynr

“It's not how much we give but how much love we put into giving.”
― Mother Teresa

"Look to the future and your eyes cannot shut. Look to the past and you can't open them. Live in the moment, and you can blink."
#41184

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 4720
  • Thank you received: 1501

Johannes (Yoshio) replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

Same for me. Till today I didn’t give it a second thought and when I still had been going to church I just said it because everyone else did so too.
So, many thanks for your interesting read as I do like to read about things and wherefrom they might historically derive from. But as I said, I haven’t cared about it till today and as I don’t use this word it now makes no difference for me.

Qui-Gon Jinn: "We cannot control our emotions, but we can decide how we go along with them."
Bujinkan Busshin Dojo - Wordpressblog
NerdFitness Profile
#41186

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Connor
  • Connor's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Faculty
  • Faculty
  • Look for the bare necessities
  • Posts: 2312
  • Thank you received: 535

Connor replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

The most important part of the Amen is the "Mmm" and the "nnn".

Those buzzing sounds, if you hold them for a while... MMMMMMM.

Think "Om".

House Rules: The only rules are Paradox, Humor, and Change.
#41191

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 269
  • Thank you received: 48

Tai-Da Vrikaurvan replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

I quite like that idea Connor

Jedi Apprentice Tai-Da Vrikaurvan
Apprentice to Jedi Phoenix
Former Apprentice to Streen Ynr

“It's not how much we give but how much love we put into giving.”
― Mother Teresa

"Look to the future and your eyes cannot shut. Look to the past and you can't open them. Live in the moment, and you can blink."
#41196

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 601
  • Thank you received: 75

zen-ryo senshi replied the topic: Amen - what do you think its origins are?

It is clearly an ancient word. We do not have documented evidence which link the word back to an Egyptian source, but it's not impossible - or, if you ask me, important. In modern English one would most literally translate the Hebrew origin to, "So be it!" If it does extend back further than that, it surely changed meaning and so that prehistoric origin becomes esoteric and irrelevant.

In biblical time it was used to agree with what someone else said - sort of like, "You got that right!" In its original use the one preaching or praying would never say it themselves, but others would say it to show their agreement with the speaker. However, once again, that early use has changed over the past two millennia and it has taken on an additional meaning of, "This is the end of this religious statement." I would argue that in English both uses are acceptable and neither is a direct reference back to any possible earlier Egyptian usage.

It is an interesting theory, though. Thanks for sharing.

If I speak from a good motivation out of sincerity, respect, and love for others, my actions are good, virtuous. If I act from a motivation of pride, hatred, criticism, and so forth, then my verbal and physical actions become nonvirtuous.

- 14th Dalai Lama

#41203
The following user(s) said Thank You: Kol Drake

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Memnoich
  • Memnoich's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Moderator
  • Moderator
  • To walk the path, is to look for the truth.
  • Posts: 834
  • Thank you received: 258

Memnoich replied the topic: Re:Amen - what do you think its origins are?

I like Zen's explanation the best, right? Right!
I always took it to mean "all praise to God". I never did research it, but I can see the tie to Egypt, or even the tie to the Annunaki of Babylon, then King being Anu, and later Ammon.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - all typos are considered intentional and full of meaningless harassment.

.oO Memnoich Oo.
"Do or do not, there is no try" ~Yoda
"Shared pain is lessened, shared joy increased." ~Spider Robinson


Dojo
Temple
Dream Log
#41257
The following user(s) said Thank You: Kol Drake

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 945
  • Thank you received: 244

Baru replied the topic: Re:Amen - what do you think its origins are?

why is such a powerful word's origin lost in history?

We are the Force.
#41409

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Kol Drake
  • Kol Drake's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Faculty
  • Faculty
  • koldrake55@yahoo.com
  • Posts: 4315
  • Thank you received: 1951

Kol Drake replied the topic: Re:Amen - what do you think its origins are?

Technically speaking, a word is just a word. Any 'power' or impact it may have is given to it by a person or people.

Energetically speaking, there are plenty of ritual mages/magic users who will talk all about how the sounds (waves of energy created by the mouth, etc.) are specific vibrations/frequencies which are necessary in 'calling the spirits/heaven/angels' whatever. Then again, talk to a chaos mage and they do some things with no regard, rhyme or reason and get results... so, mystical words or what is given 'power' by the user?

How does so much 'good stuff' get lost over the ages?

Conquests, religious zealots burning books (and people); heck -- the Great Library of Alexandria was burnt to the ground like 4 times over the early centuries. HUGE amounts of information was lost each time. The writings and inventions of Leonardo Da Vinci went 'lost' for centuries... and consider what he knew in the late 1400s/early 1500s...

When he died in France in 1519 he left his notes to his loyal student Francesco Melzi. Melzi looked after the notes for quite a while but soon found he could make some handsome money by selling the old masters note and notebooks, this decision would have dire consequences for human civilization as a whole.

On those notebooks were anatomical discoveries that could have saved millions of lives -
* Leonardo had discovered arteriosclerosis (plaque deposits on the walls of veins). This would be rediscovered in the 1900s
* He had the first full anatomic drawing of a human, from the vascular system to the muscular system and the nervous system.

Although some of the conclusions he came to were wrong about the human body, his mastery of artwork meant that his drawings would remain to be the most accurate anatomical drawings for more than 200 years. AND many of his designs could not be built until the 1900s -- so, lost knowledge for 400+ years -- luckily rediscovered. Imagine where the world might be now if his works had been widely published and built upon?
#41417
The following user(s) said Thank You: Jax

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.191 seconds